©2017 by Tanvi Misra. Proudly created with Wix.com

 

Cities. Migration. Justice.

Hello! I'm a staff writer at CQ Roll Call, covering immigration policy on the Hill — and beyond. 

 

Previously, I was at CityLab, The Atlantic's website about cities, where I primarily wrote about immigration, housing, economic inequality, and criminal justice. I also curated CityLab's bi-weekly culture newsletter, Navigator.

 

My work includes exclusive reportage, investigative data dives, award-winning features, in-depth policy analyses, as well as essays and cultural critique.

 

Through my writing, I seek to foster nuanced conversations about equity, identity, and belonging. Check out my newsletter, Eyes emoji on migration, in which I distill what I'm reading on the subjects I cover. 

FAQS:

WHERE ARE YOU FROM?

That's a complicated question for many immigrants and people of color. But here's my short answer: I grew up in New Delhi, India; I came to America for college in 2006; I have lived in Philadelphia, Chicago, and briefly, London since then; and for the last five years, I have called Washington, D.C. home. 

WHERE DID YOU GO TO SCHOOL?

I got my undergraduate degree from the University of Pennsylvania, where I studied political science and French. Later, I went to the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, and fell in love with Chicago. 

WHERE CAN I SEE YOUR WORK?

For my latest work, check out my author page on CityLab. My writing has also appeared in The Atlantic, NPR, BBC, the Texas Tribune, and McClatchy News, among other publications. 

CAN YOU FREELANCE?

Yes—HMU!

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE RECENT READS?

I've been reading a lot of fiction and poetry this year. Some recent favorites: Florida by Lauren Groff, Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado, Turner House by Angela Flournoy, If They Come For Us by Fatimah Asghar, and I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter by Erika Sánchez. 

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR TWITTER PRESENCE?

Pretty surly, with the occasional dog/cat gif. 

DOES ANYTHING MATTER?

Likely not! But it's important to keep trying.